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School Board of the City of Virginia Beach names Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. superintendent

The School Board of the City of Virginia Beach voted to name Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. as superintendent at its meeting Jan. 23. A native of Hampton Roads, Dr. Robertson began his career as a math teacher with Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) in 1988 and progressed in leadership roles including assistant principal of Bayside High School, principal of Salem High School, chief strategy and innovation officer, chief schools officer, chief of staff and acting superintendent. 

School Board of the City of Virginia Beach names Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. superintendent

The School Board of the City of Virginia Beach voted to name Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. as superintendent at its meeting Jan. 23. A native of Hampton Roads, Dr. Robertson began his career as a math teacher with Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) in 1988 and progressed in leadership roles including assistant principal of Bayside High School, principal of Salem High School, chief strategy and innovation officer, chief schools officer, chief of staff and acting superintendent. 

Logo Virginia Beach City Public Schools Charting the Course

Hundreds of Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) students will participate in the 16th Annual African American Male Summit on Jan. 20 at Frank W. Cox High School. Boys in grades six through 12 will share ideas with each other and with adult community members on topics such as student leadership, community involvement, relationship-building, and physical and mental well-being.

Sustainability

As the largest school division in the region, Virginia Beach City Public Schools understands the importance of conserving resources and protecting our environment. Testimony to our commitment, among the nearly 65,000 students and approximately 14,000 full and part-time employees, are the often unique and innovative conservation efforts that can be found in every office and school building in the division. We are proud to include as many sustainable efforts as possible into our new buildings as we strive to protect our future.

Brock Center Classroom

John B. Dey Elementary

Old Donation School Grades 2-8

Floyd E. Kellam High School

Virginia Beach Middle

Thoroughgood Elementary

Renaissance Academy

Princess Anne Middle

FACE Welcome Center

Sustainability
Report

Our Three Sustainable Goals

Goal 1: Develop a sustainable building infrastructure.
Any new or renovated building will be designed to achieve a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver rating at a minimum. To date, buildings that have earned or are projected to earn a LEED rating include:

  • Hermitage Elementary CERTIFIED
  • Virginia Beach Middle SILVER
  • Pupil Transportation Services Maintenance Facility PLATINUM
  • Windsor Oaks Elementary SILVER
  • Great Neck Middle GOLD
  • Renaissance Academy GOLD
  • Kellam High SILVER
  • College Park Elementary PLATINUM
  • Old Donation School GOLD

Goal 2: Integrate sustainable practices throughout the school division.
In 2006, a Sustainable School Committee (SSC) was formed to meet on a regular basis for the purpose of monitoring and making recommendations regarding sustainability within the school division. Members serving on this committee are from various departments throughout the division and are committed to fostering the principles of environmental, economic and social stewardship through the incorporation of sustainable practices. Read more about our Environmentally Sustainable Practices policy.

Goal 3: Educate the public about the importance of sustainability.
Each school has a Sustainable School Liaison (SSL) tasked with increasing sustainability awareness throughout the school division. Through their leadership, many of our elementary, middle and high schools have developed programs or clubs addressing the issue of sustainability.

Making a Difference

Recycling material is collected at each school. Every classroom and every office has a blue bin for recycling. Recycling is tracked at each school and listed on an excel spread sheet. Since September 2008, the school division has diverted more than 11,386 tons from the waste stream which is equivalent to saving:

  • 193,562 trees
  • 4.3 million gallons of oil
  • 34,152 cubic yards of landfill space
  • 45.5 million kilowatts of energy (enough to power 5,693 homes for one year)
  • 79.7 million gallons of water